Lowell's urban legacy is explored in dramatic fashion in a new exhibition presented by The Humanities Center at Middlesex Community College. Entitled "Lowell's Urbanscape: A Legacy of Newcomers," it features 14 vivid black-and-white photographs of Lowell by Jen Bauer and Jeff Caplan.

It opened recently and is on view through next September in the Reflections Room at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum, 115 John Street, Lowell.

Bauer is chairperson and assistant professor in MCC's Department of Communications. Caplan runs Black Ant Photographic. Both photographers were born and raised in Lowell.

Historian Richard Scott will portray Benjamin Butler, above, the politician, Civil War general and longtime Lowellian, in a talk coming up in early
Historian Richard Scott will portray Benjamin Butler, above, the politician, Civil War general and longtime Lowellian, in a talk coming up in early November.

The museum is open seven days a week, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., through Nov. 24. Winter hours are noon-4 p.m., Nov. 25-March 31. Hours return to 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., from April through the exhibit closing next year. The museum is closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day.

Nancye Tuttle's email address is nancyedt@verizon.net.

Art picks


Advertisement

ARCHITECTURAL IMPACT: Lowell is known for its architectural gems, many of which were preserved thanks to the founding of the Lowell National Historical Park 40 years ago. The Parker Lecture Series hosts the lecture "Preserving Lowell's Architectural Legacy" on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 7 p.m., at the LNHP Visitor Center on Market Street. The slide show and talk will feature Peter Aucella, who has led the park's historic preservation and development division for many years. He will share "before and after" images of early building projects from the 1970s to 1990s. Steve Stowell, administrator for the city's historic board, will focus on challenging buildings. Charles Tonetti, the LNHP's architect, will discuss current and future building preservation projects in Lowell.

The historic Wright’s Tavern in Concord is the setting for two upcoming Concord Festival of Authors programs.
The historic Wright's Tavern in Concord is the setting for two upcoming Concord Festival of Authors programs.
The lecture is free and open to all. Visit www.parkerlectures.com.

MORE LOWELL OFFERINGS: Lowell National Historical Park is partnering with community members and organizations for a series of Lowell Talk programs that are free and open to all. On Sunday, Nov. 4, at 11 a.m., all are invited to "A Conversation with Benjamin Butler" at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum Event Center, 115 John St. Butler, a Civil War general, politician and Lowell icon, was born 200 years ago this November. Interpreter Richard Scott will bring Butler to life, offering a first-person presentation based on years of research. He'll answer questions about growing up in 19th-century Lowell, politics and the Civil War, and invite the audience to explore what Butler's legacy means today. The final Lowell Talks is entitled "Remembering the 1918 Armistice and a Century of Conflict." It will be on Sunday, Nov. 11, at 10 a.m., at the Boott and will feature Shawn Driscoll of the UMass Lowell History Department. For info, visit www.nps.gov/lowell or call 978-970-5000.

AUTHOR NIGHTS: Concord Museum hosts two events at Wright Tavern, 2 Lexington Road, for the Annual Concord Festival of Authors. On Wednesday, Oct. 24, join John Holt, an award-winning journalist and author of "Drink Beer, Think Beer: Getting to the Bottom of Every Pint." His talk is 7-8:30 p.m., followed by a beer-tasting. $5, members; $12, non-members. On Monday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m., Barbara Berenson, author of "Massachusetts in the Women's Suffrage Movement," gives a talk on local suffragists and their history in the movement. Free but please register. Contact www.concordmuseum.org or call 978-369-9763, ext. 216 to register for events.