Kelly Hansen and Jeff Pilson of Foreigner
Kelly Hansen and Jeff Pilson of Foreigner (SCNG / KELLY A. SWIFT)

Part of the reason you won't hear a new full album from Foreigner any time soon is the siren's call of the road.

"To do it right, you have to spend a lot of time, which would mean a lot of time off the road, and we just can't do that," said Jeff Pilson, the band's bassist. "We have too big a machine to do that."

Foreigner, which has shows at the Cape Cod Melody Tent on Aug. 23, South Shore Music Circus on Aug. 24 and Hampton Beach Casino on Aug. 25, has tour dates running through at least October in the U.S., Germany, Poland, the U.K. and Canada. Only the South Shore show still has tickets left.

There will be very few breaks, according to Pilson.

And while it may take away from the musical creation, being able to perform regularly is something Pilson said he relishes.

"What we look forward to is that contact with the fans, that ability to perform these great songs and just to have that common experience you have when band and audience connect," he said.

Pilson said there are some differences in the songs that people go most crazy for, depending on where in the world the band is playing.

"In Europe, there's a couple songs, like, for instance, there's a song called 'That Was Yesterday.' It's very, very popular in Europe. It wasn't as popular as some of the songs here in the States."

Things are pretty standardized across the U.S., though, Pilson said.


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"Of course, different nights are different and there's a little bit of a difference, but generally in the United States, because radio was so centralized back then, everybody kind of heard the same stations," he said. "When we play here, it's pretty uniform about what people know and what seems to drive them the craziest."

Some of the band's most popular songs in the U.S. include "I Want to Know What Love Is," "Waiting for a Girl Like You," "Jukebox Hero," "Cold As Ice" and "Hot Blooded."

And while the songs themselves have remained pretty timeless, the band has undergone a lot of changes over the years. Guitarist Mick Jones is the lone remaining member from the early days.

Still, there are times when former and current band members get together to perform.

A recent example was the series of four "Double Vision: Then and Now" concerts last November, during which some of the band's original members, including Lou Gramm, Al Greenwood, Dennis Elliott, Rick Wills and Ian McDonald, performed alongside the new members. Video and audio from those concerts will be released at some point in the future.

During those times, Pilson said, he liked to call the band "Super Foreigner."

"Very few bands are able to kind of have the current and former members all work together, and the fact that we are big enough to do that is a testimony to how cool everybody is and how much it's about the music with us," he said.

For tickets to the South Shore Music Circus show, visit www.themusiccircus.org. Individual tickets cost $70.75-$141.75. The Aug. 23 show in Hyannis and the Aug. 25 show at Hampton Beach are sold out.